Review

“Painter, restorer and poet..” (Sandra Mazzinghi – Livorno Non Stop)

“Painter and poet” in Repubblica ( Local/ Florence) July 26th, 2013

“It’s in those twisted and direct faces that Maurizio Biagini’s strenght hides.” Simone Innocenti in Corriere Fiorentino, March 3, 2013

“Mostly women’s faces whose looks call and question the viewer”. Il Tirreno, March 1, 2013.

“His work is liked, it’s direct and sincere, faces that challenge you, if you can hold the stares from the canvases and paper, you will fall in love with it”. Silvia Menicagli in Livorno Non Stop, 1 Marzo 2013.

“Biagini’s art is also a social denouncement, which speaks with the universal language of art and touches the deepest inner self of the viewer”. In Toscanalibri.it

“his work is coherent with his world; tormented and restless mind, it is like he had an inalienable urgency to paint, put some order in his personal story and share the human and artistic experience gained” Stefano Barbieri in Arte a Livorno

“The theme of the exhibition continues with works composed by the next generation of painters Da Vicchio, Danti, Fontani, Guidi, and Lipizer Luschi Masaniello. In the footsteps of illustrious predecessors, but with their own colourful and developing personality, the exhibition ends with the works of contemporary artists Biagini, Bobò, Chirici, De Rosa, Fremura, Lomi Massimo, Luxardo, Madiai, Pelagatti, Pelleschi, Scola, Veroni”. Eight edition Catalogue Colori Labronici della Galleria Chiellini a Livorno.

The Group Labronico was set up in the studio of the painter Gino Romiti on July 15th, 1920 and on August 12th he presented his first art exhibition at the Palace Hotel, as it was called then Hotel Palazzo. Thirty, the current members who exhibit: Dario Ballantini, Maurizio Biagini … On www.comune.livorno.it

“Who sees in him the sign of the conceptual current still has some way to go. Because in the brush of Biagini resides something impossible to categorize. “Simone Innocenti in-Corriere della Sera Corriere Fiorentino (21 August 2013).

“(…) The result is a framework of excellent figuration, including the latest series of portraits which bear witness to just how remarkable the narrative capacity of Maurizio is and the value of his psychological analysis that closes the subjects in his situation of” widespread contemporary unease”. “We are happy to comment on this painting knowing that young people are able to turn to the world of art, namely the upgrading of feelings and emotions that generate knowledge to educate the context of the contemporary creative open models. The rest is repetition. “Dino Carlesi in Why art is not repetition, catalogue of personal exhibition “Down with the full” (2009).

“Maurizio Biagini is the type who enjoys separating the solitude with confetti of sudden happiness. There is a kind of bashful delicacy that implodes in his works. He does not like the spotlight, even if he won the Rotonda of Livorno Award (one of the highest awards in painting); he loves to escape from the mobile phones; he loves to hole up in his shadow cones. “Simone Innocenti on the monthly art Ovo.
“It ‘s in those oblique and direct faces that lies the strength of Maurizio Biagini.” Simone Innocenti in Il Corriere Fiorentino-Corriere della Sera
“His works are direct and honest faces that challenge you, and if you can cope with the stares from the canvases and paper, you will fall in love with his work” Silvia Menicagli in Livorno Non Stop

“Twenty paintings, all large, that attempt to capture the most intimate being, namely the eyes, the stares.” In “Mitology” and intimacy hidden in the works of Maurizio Biagini appeared on Il Tirreno on August 9th, 2013 to present the exhibition at the Limonaia di Castiglioncello.

“His works are reminiscent of certain songs of Vinicio Capossela but also some poems of Dino Campana. (…) His art is direct: naughty and sweet at the same time. “Simone Innocenti in “Maurizio Biagini – I Tramonti dell’assenza” appeared on the monthly Ovo (May 2012)

“The stroke is one of the great protagonists of Maurizio Biagini’s art. The artist traces it sinuous and flexible on canvas, turning it into incisive and at times nervous, full of synthetic strength. A strong mark, without a second thought, who gives life to figurative subjects by well-defined edges, immortalized with photographic cuts that contain mostly stylized female bodies, that squeeze in some cases the eye to the linearity of the Japanese graphic. Educated women in poses that are artifacts, lonely even when they are in pairs, stiffened in the flash of a moment. Aware of being observed, they are ready to show their discomfort at being in perennial balance between being  and simply, wanting to be. ”
Alice Barontini Disagio Anemico, catalogue covering works from 2008 to 2011 on display at Terme di Casciana (Pisa).

“Instinctive, sometimes ironic, often bloody, Biagini is – in the philosophical sense of the term – a” maudit “. Cursed is the spirit that drags his figures, set in a grimace of tenderness. Cursed is the way to grab life and throw it away, sublimating it in a perfectible moment, on canvas or on any media that can hold his painting. One imagines it here, but it is always somewhere else. He has the look that transcends, Biagini. He has the look of the lone sailor at the stern, him first, he felt a world. Sometimes that lost world – solitary and hardened by events – seems to go back, reversing temporal perspectives: past and present, near future and the future seem to merge or split in front specks of color. ”
Simone Innocenti Disagio Anemico, catalogue covering works from 2008 to 2011 on display at Terme di Casciana (Pisa).

“It’s evident that the entity that his images revolve around ,it’s nothing but the artist himself, with his life experience, with the burden of the past, with the trepidation of the future, his own hypersensitivity that leads him to create works of art about thoughts and feelings that others escape, details that others cannot grasp. “Stefano Barbieri When painting is an existential need (critical essay)

Also written about Maurizio: T. Paloscia, C. Musetti, F. Monti, D. Muciaccia, S. Gazzari.